Reading Mode
Reading Mode

Who do you trust?

Keith Heintschel

Who do you trust?

In the book of Joshua, we find the nation of Israel taking control of the land the Lord promised them. The people cross over and start their conquest and soon word of them starts to spread throughout the land.

In the book of Joshua, we find the nation of Israel taking control of the land the Lord promised them. The people cross over and start their conquest and soon word of them starts to spread throughout the land.

Chapter 9 starts off explaining how all of the kings west of the Jordan River had heard what happened and so they combined forces in order to confront God’s people. However, the people of Gibeon also heard tells of what Joshua had done to Jericho and Ai and they came up with a different plan.

Starting in verse 4 of chapter 9 we learn their plan. Gibeon sent ambassadors to go meet with Joshua, but they did so in disguise. First, they loaded their donkeys down with weathered saddlebags and old worn-out wineskins. They put on patched sandals and ragged clothes. The bread they took with them was dry and moldy.

When they came to the camp of Israel they lied and said they were from a distant land and wished to make a treaty with Israel. The Hivites told Joshua and the other leaders that they had heard all God had done for them in Egypt and they had also heard of what had happened to the two Amorite kings east of the Jordan River. They claimed that the people had instructed them to go on the long journey and make a treaty with Israel and so they had set out.

The Israelites had some doubts about their story, but after examining the food and condition of their supplies, they made the treaty. However, three days later they learned the truth about the deception.

When the people found out their leaders had made a treaty with people in the land the Lord promised them, they were not happy. The leaders for their part were irritated at the Hivites but their hands were tied and so they made them slaves because they could not kill them with the treaty in place. All of this happened after the Lord had specifically told the people not to make any treaties with the people living in the land (Exodus 34:15).

Often when reading the old testament, it is easy to get lost in some of the language used and all of the unfamiliar names are disorienting. In this story though, the message is loud and clear: do not rely on your own understanding, but trust in the Lord for guidance.

It is easy to fall into the trap of using logic to make important decisions, but they will backfire if they are not in-line with God’s will for you. Our challenge today and every day is to not use the world’s wisdom when choosing which way to go, but the Lord’s guidance in all of our choices. We can accomplish this by seeking wise counsel and more importantly praying before making decisions, especially ones with long lasting consequences.